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Monthly Archives: November 2010

Ancient Amazingness

This week’s Brieflier Noted included “The Golden Mean,” by Annabel Lyon, which sort of sounds like my wet dream in heaven as overseen by Santa Claus: This vivid imagining of the encounter between Aristotle and the young Alexander the Great casts the philosopher as a manic-depressive, veering “from black melancholy to golden joy.” Right?! Tweet

Deep Travel

Think of that feeling you have when you’re on a truly great vacation: your stress levels drop, trivial concerns reveal themselves to be just that, and you feel—you know—that life’s purpose is deeper and simpler than what you’d believed before (side note: this happens to me every time I go to New Orleans). Now think […]

Truth and Dare

This week’s Brieflier Noted included “By Nightfall,” by Michael Cunningham; “The Killer of Little Shepherds,” by Douglas Starr; “Foreign Bodies,” by Cynthia Ozick; and “How to Live,” by Sarah Bakewell. The selection from the “By Nightfall” review intrigued me: “Cunningham’s latest novel seems almost like a dare: can Auguste Rodin, Daisy Buchanan, Damien Hirst, Gustav […]

Watchdogs

Last week, Transparency International—an organization that aims to raise awareness of governmental abuses for private gain, including bribery, kickbacks, and embezzlement —released its 2010 Corruption Perceptions Index, a measurement of public-sector corruption in a hundred and seventy-eight countries worldwide. Read more at newyorker.com… Tweet

Guggenheim Mashup

This summer, just when it seemed that the art world was suffering from biennial overload, the Guggenheim Museum and YouTube announced a fresh approach. Their joint venture, “YouTube Play: A Biennial of Creative Video” set out “to attract innovative, original, and surprising videos from around the world, regardless of genre, technique, background, or budget,” and […]

Feminism and the 2010 Midterm Elections

What do yesterday’s election results mean for women? This is the question I asked Rebecca Traister, a senior writer at Salon, whose book on the 2008 election, “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” is reviewed this week in The New Yorker. In her book, Traister focuses on the anti-Hillary Clinton sentiment that polarized the Democratic party, as […]

Brieflier Noted

Kicked off a new section on the Book Bench today: Brieflier Noted, which features a sentence–maybe even two! Crazy!–from each Briefly Noted book review in the magazine. I plan to do this every Tuesday. This week’s issue includes reviews on “The Convent,” by Panos Karnezi; “C,” by Tom McCarthy; “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” by Rebecca […]